Generating Terrestrial Planets Pt.1

This is related to Semi-Empirical Stellar Equations. I have had some questions easily answered, and others which are difficult or impossible to get the kind of accuracy I want.

I’m going to order what I’ve learned by the order I am planning to use these equations, marking equations loosely based on empirical data with an asterisk, and double asterisks for things I’ve completely made up to simplify calculation.

  • Radius of Surface* (Rsurface):
    5500km mean, 1550km standard deviation
  • Density* [based on common rock types] (Dplanet):
    4.7g/cm3 mean, 0.55g/cm3 standard deviation
  • Volume [assumes a perfect sphere] (Vplanet):
    4/3 * π * Rsurface3
  • Mass (Mplanet):
    Dplanet * Vplanet
  • Surface Gravity (gsurface):
    6.673×10-11Nm2kg-2 * Mplanet / Rsurface2
  • Surface Area [assumes a perfect sphere]:
    4 * π * Rsurface2
  • Atmospheric Pressure Reduction Rate** (Pr):
    Pr [unit: none] = -0.00011701572 [unit: s2 / m2] * gsurface
  • Atmospheric Halving Height** (hd):
    hd [unit: m-1] = ln(2) / Pr
  • Atmospheric Volume at Constant Pressure** (Vsim):
    (4/3 * π * (Rsurface + hd)3 – Vplanet) * 2
  • Surface Atmospheric Pressure (Psurface):
    Psurface [unit: kPa] = ???
  • Lowest Safe Orbital Height** (h0):
    h0 [unit: m] = ln(1.4×10-11 / Psurface) / Pr
  • True Atmospheric Volume (Vatm):
    4/3 * π * (Rsurface + h0)3 – Vplanet

Vsim exists to support a simulation of an entire planet’s atmospheric contents using my simple fluid simulation mechanic. The magic constant used to calculated Pr is based on Earth’s atmosphere, it can be changed to set an exact “atmospheric height” while maintaining other properties of this simulation.

  • Atmospheric Pressure at Altitude** (Paltitude):
    Paltitude [unit: kPa] = Psurface * exp(Pr * maltitude) [Pr may be -Pr, I don’t remember]

This post is obviously incomplete, but it’s been a while since I posted anything here, and I felt like I should go ahead and share what I’ve been up to.

Everything Is Okay (Music)

A while back I produced a work of Modern Art with the software suite known as Factorio. This only needed minor editing but I was a very lazy girl. Today, I bring you… Everything Is Okay, a custom alarm to let you know that your world isn’t ending.

Lost Summoner (Drabble)

Decorations rattled from the boom of suddenly displaced air. A figure appeared in the hallway across from the study. Her eyes met a dragoness on a couch, looking back with a neutral expression. “Where am I? Are you a demon?”

“My home. And it depends on where you are from, summoner.. However, I do enjoy collecting lost souls.” She smirked, “You seem a little lost.” The dragon stood slowly, tasting the fear radiating from her visitor.

The figure held her ground as the dragoness approached, smile growing wider, “Want to make a deal, my dear?”

“What kind of a deal?”


Drabble is a form of extremely short storytelling, where you are limited to exactly 100 words.

Semi-Empirical Stellar Equations

I’ve spent a lot of time trying to answer certain questions in astronomy, where I just want a rough approximation for the purpose of a simulation, and don’t need an exact answer. These are some of the equations I’ve come up with.

Temperature (K) → Absolute Magnitude (visual):
Mv = 35.463 * exp(-0.000353 * T)
Roughly accurate between 2000-50000 Kelvin. Probably doesn’t continue accuracy at hotter temperatures.

Absolute Magnitude (visual) → Luminosity (solar luminosities):
Lsun = 100 * exp(-0.944 * Mv)
Accurate between 0-10 Mv. Probably continues accuracy relatively well.

Spectral (UBVRI) Filters:
Ultraviolet, Blue, Visual, Red, Infrared.
Objects are listed in different indexes:
UV for the hottest objects (stellar remnants, galaxies), then BV (the majority of stars), and RI for the coolest (LTY “stars” and below).

B-V index (x) → Temperature (K):
T = -772.2x3 + 3152x2 – 6893x + 9500
Sorta accurate between 0-2. (This equation I am least comfortable with, and don’t plan to use.)

Main Sequence Luminosity/Mass Relation:
Lstar / Lsun = (Mstar / Msun)3.5


Yerkes Classes’ T/Mv Relations

These equations are shown as functions where x is temperature in Kelvin, and f(x) is absolute visual magnitude. Most are valid from 2400 K to a little bit past 30000 K, the exceptions are noted. For the hypergiants and white dwarfs, the range is within an elliptical region, of which these functions define the major axis; for all others, they are a center-point along a Yerkes classification.

Hypergiants (0):
f(x) = -8.9
Supergiants (Ia):
f(x) = -0.00135x3 + 0.0233x2 + 0.0187x – 7.349
Supergiants (Ib):
f(x) = 0.00329x3 – 0.0962x2 + 0.829x – 7.209
Bright Giants (II):
f(x) = 0.00557x3 – 0.166x2 + 1.505x – 6.816
Giants (III):
f(x) = 0.0135x3 – 0.373x2 + 3.019x – 7.233
Subgiants (IV):
f(x) = -0.151x2 + 2.216x – 5.128 (4450-100000 K only)
Dwarfs (V):
f(x) = 0.00193x5 – 0.0615x4 + 0.742x3 – 4.257x2 + 12.439x – 12.996 (note: this one is the least accurate)
Subdwarfs (VI):
f(x) = 0.131x3 – 3.275x2 + 27.576x – 71.7 (3050-6000 K only)
White Dwarfs (VII):
f(x) = 0.489x + 10.01 (4450-30000 K only)

cc-pkg: A ComputerCraft Package Manager

ComputerCraft is a Minecraft mod that adds Lua-based computers. Over time, many programs have been created, and several package managers have come and gone. As I write this, all that I have seen are gone – their original authors have moved on, and shut down the servers hosting packages.

Now it’s my turn to sell you a package manager: cc-pkg. Unlike the others, I expect this to remain viable – even if I’m gone from the picture. If you want to skip to trying it, here’s how it’s installed (and how to ask for help):

pastebin get 9Li3u4Rc /bin/pkg
/bin/pkg help

(I’d also recommend installing the unix-like package, which adds /bin to your path, among a few other small tweaks.)

Why is cc-pkg different?

  1. It is built on ComputerCraft’s pastebin integration.
  2. It does not require a maintainer.
  3. It is extremely simple – and flexible.

cc-pkg has the same three sub-commands of the default pastebin program: get, run, and put*. They each do exactly what you’d expect them to do, except they can use package names as well as pastebin IDs. Package names are alphanumeric characters and dashes, and there are two types of packages.

Both are plaintext lists of the form key=value. The main type of package is a list of file paths (all starting with a forward slash) as keys set to package names or pastebin IDs as values. This is how cc-pkg knows which files to download and where to put them. The second type is simply called a list; and contains package names as keys, set to package names or pastebin IDs. Lists are saved to a local file cc-pkg uses to resolve package names – overwriting any existing entries with the same package name, which is how updating is done.

With just those core features, I think the system is viable. But since writing the first draft of this, I added one more feature to make cc-pkg more extensible: command extensions.

Under the Hood

cc-pkg keeps metadata through the following files:

  • /etc/pkg/names.list: The master list of package names cc-pkg knows.
  • /etc/pkg/ids.list: A raw ordered list of every pastebin ID cc-pkg has successfully downloaded.
  • /etc/pkg/<package-name>: The file describing each installed package is itself stored by name.

It uses global functions so that it can be loaded as an API to make a more advanced package management system on top of it – or just to make programs automatically download requirements using cc-pkg.

  • get(name_or_id, path): The core function that installs a package (path is optional).
  • down(id): Downloads from a pastebin ID.
  • save(path, data): Writes data to a file.
  • append(path, data): Appends data to a file.
  • id(name_or_id): Recursively checks the package names list until a pastebin ID is returned.
  • type(data): Recognizes data as a package, list, or unknown type.
  • src(data): Combines this data with existing package names (overwriting if duplicates exist).

On top of this, if a file is saved to /lib/pkg-commands/<name> and a user runs pkg <name>, that file will be run with the other arguments. This allows adding new functions, and overwriting the core functions to add additional features, if desired.

An example of this is the pkg-search package, which adds a search command to look for specific package names within the master list. I am also considering adding an extension which downloads short descriptions of packages, allowing you to view what is available.

*The put command is not implemented as of version 1.4.2 1.5.2, the latest at the time of writing finishing this introduction.